Redshanks, Greenshanks and Marsh Sandpiper

Common Redshank -4
Common Redshank -4

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Common Redshank-1
Common Redshank-1

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Common Redshank-6
Common Redshank-6

Photographed in the outskirts of Matara.

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Common Redshank -4
Common Redshank -4

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Common Redshank
(පොදු රත්පා සිලිබිල්ලා)
Tringa totanus

The first and second images of a juvenile Common Redshank was spotted at 'Bundala' National Park.

 

Third, fourth and fifth again from 'Bundala' but during different trips.

Image 6 from the outskirts of Matara.

 
Still to capture photo
Still to capture photo

Still waiting to get lucky and capture image.

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Still to capture photo
Still to capture photo

Still waiting to get lucky and capture image.

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Spotted Redshank
(තිත් රත්පා සිලිබිල්ලා)
Tringa erythropus

Yet to capture image

 
Marsh Sandpiper-5
Marsh Sandpiper-5

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Marsh Sandpiper-1
Marsh Sandpiper-1

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Marsh Sandpiper-4
Marsh Sandpiper-4

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Marsh Sandpiper-5
Marsh Sandpiper-5

Photographed in Bundala National Park.

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Marsh Sandpiper
(වගුරු සිලිබිල්ලා)
Tringa stagnatilis

Seen at the salt flats in 'Bundala', this Sandpiper was among many other water birds who were sifting through the mud looking for food. It is the bigger bird among others in these images.

Came across one again in Bundala on a different day in Bundala. Image 4 and 5 are from the second sighting.

 
Common Greenshank-1
Common Greenshank-1

Photographed in Mannar.

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Common Greenshank-2
Common Greenshank-2

Photographed in Mannar.

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Common Greenshank-1
Common Greenshank-1

Photographed in Mannar.

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Common Greenshank
(පොදු පලල්පා සිලිබිල්ලා)
Tringa nebularia

Seen at Giants Tank area in Mannar, based on the shape of the beak I believe this is a Common Greenshank.